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and science. and more young women in gender study and literature. field that are not going pay as well. when they enter the workplace you see more women going in to non-profit and shorter hours and more men in and investment banks and computer science. there isn't any reason the two groups should be paid the same if they make different choices. a man and woman in the investment bank, they got out of cold man sacks. those should be paid the same. they are paid the same. if there are not there avenues to sue. that's the big difference. >> what dow you think about the white house counsel on women and girls? >> i think the white house needs to have a counsel on men and boys. because you can see that young men have lower earnings than young women. if you look at single men and women than the single men have lower earnings. you see they are far higher rates of boys cropping out of high school than girls. boys are getting less education now than girls. and so if the white house wants to have a counsel on women and girls, that's fine. as long as they have one on men and boys too. that i think is the
science now in understanding and a lot of is informed by the psychology research and so the science of the mobilization turnout has gotten much better it's still pretty vague and it's reinvesting in a lot of mobilization techniques because we have learned in the last decade how they work as we have two separate things you sort of know once you get somebody to implicate voting by the two per cent and now we have better targeting techniques to figure out who you talk to and about what what message or targeting but the big campaigns do targeting and analysis on the front end of the allows them to understand far more precise clean way for their turn of targets and they don't need to talk to until who the persuasion targets are and if you are narrowing your universe the people you're trying to persuade you can make your messages sharper. you can sort of focus or qualitative research and focus groups and polling and an experimental testing to get more closely to the question of what that, what is at 7%. so you are talking to 7% and then not messages that are speaking to a far broader size
on them. we we have a far better science now in understanding what mate voted people to vote and a lot of it informed by behavioral psychological research. the science persuasion still pretty vague, and so i do think that there's been a sort of reinvesting in a lot of mobilization techniques in part because we have learned in the last decade how they work. you have the two separate thing. you know when you get to somebody what you can do by increase their likelihood of voting by 2% with i have better techniques to figure out who you talk to about what. i don't think about it necessarily as message or targets. good campaigns do targeting and analysis on the front thanked allows them to understand in a far more precise clean way for who are the turnout targets who they don't need to talk to until it's time to push them to vote and the persuasion targets. if you're narrowing the people you can presuede you can make the message sharper. you focus the groups in polling and exoormt tal testing to get more closely to the question whether it's 7%, if you're talking 7% who are persuadable and n
cool, techie-type gadgets we saw. >> he started his own company to turn science fiction into reality. >> ah! >> science nonfiction. >> starting 10, 12, 16 foot back from the screen, we can be accurate when pointing. >> john actually created technology you can in a manipulate with the use of your hands. you see in this video, gloves with sensors on fingers and backs of the palms of the hand. watch what he can do. >> moving left, moving left to right. up and down and in and out, control. >> it looks like the skyline of downtown los angeles, and he is maneuvering just using his hands and his fingers. it's just like what we see in movies like "iron man." robert downey jr. standing there, manipulating, bringing things together just with the move of his digits. >> i need the sound going -- >> gross level remote control here just with the hands. backwards. >> utilizes this technology to go through and play videos. >> how cool is it, for our show. >>> clumsy cat. [ laughter ] >> saying that sex sells. apparently that is also the case in the real estate industry in queensland, australia. here
labs are opening their doors to scientists of tomorrow. abc7 health and science reporter carolyn johnson has more. >> when irene medina returned to high school this fall she had plenty of stories to tell about her summer job. >> i did my first surgery in iraq. it was interesting and exciting for me. >> instead of flipping burgers , she was helping researchers at ucsf understand brain function. it is helping newborn infants survive brain traumas and other injuries. >> i started thinking, what they are doing is something great. >> across the bay at the university of california, they were doing great science too working on a study that could some day help human muscles regenerate. >> we saw improved muscle regeneration, actually. it was interesting. >> the path into these high end labs began with internship programs from the california institute of regenerative medicine. once in the program they are assigned mentors to gather them in real life lab assignments. >> they get down to the genetic level and cellular level, and they really understand that their specific part of the project
are opening their doors to scientists of tomorrow. abc7 health and science reporter carolyn johnson has more. >> when irene medina returned to high school this fall she had plenty of stories to tell about her summer job. >> i did my first surgery in iraq. it was interesting and exciting for me. >> instead of flipping burgers , she was helping researchers at ucsf understand brain function. it is helping newborn infants survive brain traumas and other injuries. >> i started thinking, what they are doing is something great. >> across the bay at the university of california, they were doing great science too working on a study that could some day help human muscles regenerate. >> we saw improved muscle regeneration, actually. it was interesting. >> the path into these high end labs began with internship programs from the california institute of regenerative medicine. once in the program they are assigned mentors to gather them in real life lab assignments. >> they get down to the genetic level and cellular level, and they really understand that their specific part of the project including the li
lab. the author of the sushi economy pulls the curtain that of the operatives that use social science to determine the outcome of elections. >> host: well, sasha this is a provocative and timely look as we are weeks away from the election. i want to know how did you come to want to write this book? >> guest: i covered campaigns beginning in philadelphia, so i was paying more attention to sort of tactics and techniques in the physical world of campaigns just because in the big city so much attention was being paid to the vote counted and precinct targeted so i talked to people that were making tv ads and i was always shocked as i think anybody that spent time on the campaigns is that most people couldn't explain to me why they did anything that they were doing. how do you know that and why do you do that and at some point they did it because the it always done it that we were they had some sort of a rule that wasn't based on any research. so some sort of skepticism about a lot of practices that were taking place and the way people were spending money and devoting time and resources and
, mathematics and science and you have a new book called "why does the world exist: an existential detective story." >> you say that sarcastically. (laughter) >> stephen: that's as sincere as i get. (laughter) first question: why does world exist exist? (laughter) what led you to write this book? >> good question. i was raised in a very religious family. >> stephen: what kind? >> catholic. >> stephen: how religious were you? >> i said the rosary. i did--. >> stephen: basic stuff, basic stuff. >> i confessed my sins. >> stephen: are you still catholic? >> no. >> stephen: well then how religious could your family have been? evidently they failed. >> yeah, they told me this story that the world exists because god--. >> stephen: in the beginning. >> exactly. there's already a book about that, by the way. (laughter) so you listened and then at some point you said i don't buy it. >> i began to have doubts and i want to know why the universe exists. if there's a reason i want to know that and god might be the reason, you may believe that but you know,--. >> stephen: you should care about this myste
with countries around the world in deeper trade, investment in science and technology, development, all efforts that can spark economic growth for all of our people. such efforts depend on a spirit of mutual interest and mutual respect. no government or company, no school will be confident working in a country where its people are endangered. four partnerships to be affective, our citizens must be secured and our efforts must be welcomed. a politics based only on anger, one based on dividing the world between us and them, if it ultimately undermines those who tolerate it. all of us have an interest in standing up to those forces. let us remember that muslims have suffered the most at the hands of extremism. on the same day our civilians were killed and in benghazi a turkish police officer was killed days before his wedding. several afghan children were more by their parents just days after they were killed by a suicide bomber in kabul. it may initially be focused on the west, but over time it cannot be contained. the same impulses of extremism is used to justify war between tribes and clans. it
it be guided by science and by -- [applause] by accurate public policy analysis, by studies that show things like what are the rewards that are reaped from investment in public funding of contraception or in having everyone be insured as a society and what as a society do we gain from that, what is the consequences if we don't? it's been very disappointing to see the ways in which over the last few years science has really been pushed out of so much of our legislative process. there are bills that have been enacted across the country requiring medical providers to give statements to women who are coming for services, frequently abortion services, that are based on untrue science. and that's a scary moment regardless of how you feel about abortion and what your personal or legal beliefs are about that. to require medical professionals to mislead their patients is not where we should be as a country, and i think those type of scientific facts and accurate public policy analyses should be given much more credence in our political and government process than our ideology. [applause] >> i think i
. but only 14% are republican. social science is only 6%. >> 70 2% self identify as liberal. which is a big disparity between them and the general public. john: you were a junior when obama was elected? >> it was light a little of the colt it happened across the nation. john: not just the attitude but there are actual space -- speech restriction red light, yellow light and this university was demoted? >> to policies unc maintains which is sexual-harassment if you attended college and other than unc it bans all sexually explicit jokes. john: david, you have a copy what did you find? >> sexually explicit jokes jokes, books, it is different -- difficult to control how you look at someone. policy in the residence halls to avoid using the returners spoken word in the way that offends. that is a rage asleep fraud. a picture of mitt romney would offend 70%. [laughter] john: you may not explicitly or implicitly asked for sex. john: then how do you get there? [laughter] is it automatically rate? >> these policies are not well thought out. this is what you get to with bureaucracies. john: we will not
. and the biggest singles market, not the debt fuel consumption. driven by the advances in science and research. and a clean, green economy, with the low carbon technologies, leading the world. [applause] i have to tell you, in the last half, the most short-sighted of arguments, that we have to choose between going green. this is not just the right thing to do, this is a fantastic opportunity. the economy in britain is going strong we're right now. to create thousands of jobs, and the technology that will power a economies in the decades to come. going green, means going for growth. more energy that we produce ourselves, as a planet that we can proudly and over to our children. and going green means -- but the conservatives know there is no doubt that we will hold on to their promises on the environment. [applause] of course, there was a time when it looked like they got it. it seems like a long time ago, and there is the naturalist face. the windmills are gently turning, the sun is shining, and the exercise is quite brilliant. partyen at last year's conference they ruined it all, that you can
growth and in our history. the next is science given at grades five, eight and ten. you see the same double digit trend with the district moving from 51.2 to 51.6. and as i said when we look we have three lenses in which we look at these scores. the first is over time. the second is movement. looking at the same group of students that took the test two years in a row and how did they move in their proficiency level? so we had matched scores for 30,000 students. and when they began the year last year they came in at 60.4 percent proficiency and by the end of the year 62.7 or 63% of them were profishtd. looking at all the proficiency levels and how students moved we found the movement to be around 16.6 percent or 70% to round it which means seven out of every ten students either remained profirkt or advanced or moved up one level. okay. i'm going to repeat that. seven out of every ten students either remained proficient and advanced or moved up a level. in math we found the movement to be at 73% and this was similar to what we saw in [inaudible]. as i said the third lens by w
the museum and the california academy of sciences, the garden was designed by the california spring blossom and wildfilower association. here is a truly enchanting and tranquil garden along a path behind a charming gate. this garden is the spot to woo your date. stroll around and appreciate its unique setting. the gorgeous brick walkway and a brick wall, the stone benches, the rustic sundial. chaired the part -- share the bard's word hundred famous verses from a shakespearean plays. this is a gem to share with someone special. pack a picnic, find a bench, and enjoy the sunshine, and let the whimsical words of william shakespeare and floats you and your loved one away. this is one of the most popular wedding locations and is available for reservations. take a bus and have no parking worries. shakespeares' garden is ada accessible. located at the bottom of this hill, it is a secret garden with an infinite in captivating appeal. carefully tucked away, it makes the top of our list for most intimate pyknic setting. avoid all taurus cars and hassles by taking a cable car. or the 30, 45, or 91 bus
, that there is a new science -- repair, renewal, and rehabilitation. that's different from building something new. you cannot fix each and every crack in the city. it's like each city, you're talking about 3,000, 5,000 miles of pipe. so you have to prioritize where they can go and fix the system. narrator: each city faces unique situations, so they must determine the asset management approach that best addresses these challenges. inspections can be done with various technologies, often by a robot... or personally by a technician on a bicycle. sensors detect breaks, cracks, and weaknesses in the pipe. man: we have roots at this cap lateral at 79. narrator: tree roots can grow into the pipe, splitting it apart. man: more light roots at 69. narrator: sometimes they may even find fully collapsed sections. after gathering the data, utilities can assess the need for rehabilitation. sinha: you have to choose the rehabilitation technique so that the life of the pipe can be extended 30 years, 40 years, 50 years. allbee: any asset has an optimal investment strategy. if you're making investments in that asset to
-- they are going to get dirty. . >> reporter: we partnered with a science and his students to find what was lurking in local bags. >> we just wipe round the areas where kids are most likely to touch. the handle and the top but also a bit of the front and the back. >> reporter: they swabbed more than 100 bags provided by three elementary schools. then went back to the lab to transfer cells from the swabs to dishes. >> you can see a variety of different things on any one box. >> reporter: what grew may gross you out. 59 of the 103 bags had low levels of staph, two had high amounts. >> having something like this get in to the wrong place at the wrong time could lead to a potential infection. >> reporter: including mrsa. the low levels of yeast are okay but that could mean the bags have big problems. >> they indicate just the fact that my box is coming in contact with vegetation, my food or sitting it on the lawn as i wait for the bus. >> reporter: and he found something that is very bad, 23 bags had fecal bacteria, four had dangerously high levels. >> get in to the system and in a good sized dose
dice mas. . fuse science ha desarrollado productos con avanzada tecnologia pensando en la comodidad del consumidor y en el alivio a coro plazo, un ejemplo de esto es el energel, un gel que produce alivio cuando hay dolor o fatiga muscular y algun tipo de proceso antinflamatorio en las articulaciones. tambien deportistas como tiger woods, big papi david ortiz, el pelotero de las medias rojas de boston jose bautista, nolan carroll de los miami dolphins, entre otros son aficionados del energel. http://www.fusescience. com yy en las tiendas naturistas gnc. hacemos una pausa: y cuando volvamos toda la informacion deportiva.. pero antes un adelanto con el socio!! como les va buenas tardes y buen inicio de semana para todos, fue un fin de semana de mucha actividad deportiva para los equipos del area que en dos disciplinas estan luchando por su clasificacion directa al playoff, y nuestro primer resumen tiene que ver con el iniciamos en el candem yard donde los orioles derrotaron 6-3 a los medias rojas y esperaron una victoria de texas ante los angelinos que no se concretó. luego de
health risks. >> we had to keep pushing. science is the basis of everything. the 482 megawatt coal-fired facility owners say that the today is lesse about pollution control and more change in price for gas.al what happens now with this prime waterfront property currently owned by pepco -- >> it's an opportunity to have something exciting to happen in of mixed use development. now 15th thousand tons of begins. 15,000 tons. most of the employees have been or retired. six are still looking for work. >> jacqui jeras has a look at forecast. >> we started out really foggy northwest of the metro area this morning. here's an awesome time lapse i from oakdaleyou ijamsville.in look at the that shallow layer to awhich gave way beautiful sunny conditions. we goill change as throughout the day. clouds mostly on the increase. inyou can see them pushing from the south. that will bring a chance of rain. heavy rain across the tennessee river valley as well as parts of south.p that system will be with us the couple days. if you are traveling today, memphis, raleigh, charlotte, all of the leas. newar
. but youth nd giving tthm a ith - plaaform to exxress themselves p whether that's in science or mathematics." let's talk abbut you've probably heard of is hit "gangnam style".nats: oppa gangnam style... that's the song.... along wwthhthe moves.. it's racked up more than 336 miiliin views on youtube since july.the song rose to nnmber two on the billboard hot 100 last weekpsy has already saii that if it does reach number onn on the billboard hart.. he wiil perform gangnam style áátoplessáá ii a place where worry...the south orean t - rapper said hh also plans to release his firsttuus. single sometimm in november.i've alsoo heard that he ill rrlease n albbm then as well.psy has signed on with a man nnmed scooter.. who is justin biebers manager.things are geeerally going well for both of them.. but justin had a weekend.nnts: justin singgng tte iebs kicked-off concert saturday night in arizona. justin.... got sick during the show... hh actually threw up on staae ! affer takkng a to the stage and explained to his fann that he wasn't peellng well. but the show must gooon so... he conti
that suspects will get convicted, but there is good forensic science and it is more likely that innocent people will not be convicted if there is good forensic science and that is what this lab is about. >> and the crime lab is an independent lab and not answering to the chief of police. >> tony williams said it was his vision that got the project off the ground. >> tomorrow marks ten years since the d.c. sniper attacks began during the 3 week spree. the two were captured and convicted. mohammed was executed and roberts is serving a sentence. we covered the story back then, paul, and is there anything that sticks out in your mind. >> the lind -- the murder of linda franklin. a lady going about her business at the home depot, outside with her husband. and then if you recall there was one person who came forward and said he saw the sniper and was lying. and that sends people wondering, what was going on here? it was just such a frightening time. >> i think i remember when this broke and no one knew what was going on, i was sent to the location in aspen hill and i remember in the days afterwards a
that have not been here before, is a science and technology not for profit policy think tank if you will win the washington, d.c. area that focuses on how science and technology affect the national security. for quite some time we have studied issues in and around what people callasymmetric threats and most importantly, terrorism. this past year professor alexander and i released our second volume on al qaeda about 11 years after the first volume on al qaeda right before 9/11, and we would like to call your attention to it. there are copies available year and of course available on the web at amazon always good things and i want to highlight it today because it is more of a gift we are going to give to our panel members for taking the time of their busy schedules to the very least i can promise you a good sleep if you read it. [laughter] the second look at the potomac institute has been involved in over this past year is an effort with the bechtel corporation to look at the cyber issue, in particular the seibu doctrine. that volume edited by tim and i is in the publication of you have on you
saying the therapies have quote, no basis in science or medicine. >>> a devastating new attack in afghanistan to talk about today. a suicide bomber killed 14 people including three american soldiers in the volatile eastern province of khost. it comes a day after the death toll in the 11-year-old war in afghanistan reached 2,000. but that number does not include the number of americans injured in afghanistan and who died when they were transferred elsewhere. which would then raise the total to over 2100. nbc news has special coverage today across the middle east. lester holt joins us live now at the afghan capital of kabul. that number 2,000 representing only americans who died in afghanistan not those who were injured in the country. but didn't die until they were transported wrels. that's a big distinction. this is a major marker to reach now with the number of casualties. >> it is. and we've been talking about a number over 2100 for some time. 2,000 representing those who died here. but remember the aeromedical system is such a soldier could be wounded on the battlefield and
our police resources wisely or not using science to guide where to use our police resources. we need to look at our transportation system and revolutionize that. that will improve a lot of things, public health, public safety, commerce. so we need to be looking with a vision for the future about what we want our city to be. and i think i have done that before and like i said, i'm for prevention. and i'm for looking to the future and figuring out how we can sculpt a better san francisco and that is what i will do as supervisor. thank you, mr. davis. i want to remind folks and point out that we have seen a disturbing trend in san francisco over the past couple ever years. of years. we have had a lot of leadership appointed for us. an appointed mayor, appointed district attorney when our leaders are chosen for us instead of by us. if you want leadership in our city, i'll i'm your candidate. at juliandavis.org, there is more detail about the grassroots campaign we're building. i encourage you to look where the candidates are getting their money from. i think it says a lot about whose i
. an innovative, inventive economy driven by advances in science and research. and yes, a clean, green economy too, powered by the new low- carbon technologies. britain leading the world. [applause] but i have to tell you, we will not succeed in this last task unless we can see off that most short-sighted of arguments, that we have to choose between going green and going for growth. decarbonising our economy isn't just the right thing to do, it's a fantastic economic opportunity. the green economy in britain is growing strongly right now, bringing in billions of pounds and creating thousands of jobs -- in wind, solar and tidal energy, the technologies that will power our economy in the decades to come. going green means going for growth. but more than that, it means going for more energy that we produce ourselves and which never runs out, it means going for clear air and clean water and a planet we can proudly hand over to our children. going green means going forward. so let the conservatives be in no doubt. we will hold them to their promises on the environment. [applause] of course, there was a
said to me in different occasions i got to use what i learned in my math or science class or english class in the job that i got paid for this summer, so it is more that we can expect the curriculum to real world experiences that students understand are going to connect them to what they're going to do in the future i think the more engaging the curriculum becomes and the more we keep the students engaged and i am committing publicly we want the students involved and we want your feedback. >> about what about the simpler things and the resources? because a lot of students -- muni passes and students can't access the schools without getting on the back of the bus and maybe a chance of getting caught by the muni police? or the simple stuff like the libraries? and access to printers? what if there is not access at homes? what about the simpler things for students? >> great idea. you probably notice we're taking notes. i think they're great ideas and again we're going to be tapping your ideas about how do we really engage the authentic student voices and not only at high school lev
their heads thinking there is no way this could possibly work. the practices have no basis in science or medicine and they will now be relegated to the dust bin of quackery, your governor, david, is calling what you do quackery. can you just react to that and tell me how this new law will affect what you do? >> yes. let me tell you what kind of governor we have now. so, for instance, if a child is -- let me tell you first, any good competent therapist knows that homosexual feelings can result when one -- i'm talking about boys now, when one is raped or sexually molested. later in life, those feelings come up. what our governor decided now he knows best that the kind of profound affective therapy is quackery, that handles this kind of situation. >> david, how about the american psychiatric -- forgive me, i'll add on to the governor, the american psychiatric association says the potential risk of reparative therapy is great including depression, anxiety, self-destructive behavior, reparative therapy, this is the truth wins out, reparative therapy is junk science winning out by religious
who won't get out of bed have science on their side showing mela tonin affects teenagers later at night and because they need nine hours of sleep teens have a tougher time getting up in the morning. schools across the nation experimenting with starting school later in the mornings based on these findings. >> and there is a brave woman with no problem telling a black bear who is really in charge. take a look. >> this unwelcome visitor left after the lady comes out and shows him who is boss. she just shouted at the bear who scurried away this, is not the first time he had to deal with a bear on the deck. so she's not worried. and the user who posted this video... take a look. >> wow. >> and the user posted this video has a series on bear encounters. >> and there is a huge week ahead in the bay area including fleet week. >> and first, jail breaking an iphone illegal? we'll take a look and charges on a pg&e bill. >> and there is a masked man forces police to evacuate part of downtown san mateo. the man explains how it was just a misunderstanding. >> a killer virus researchers looki
productive sciences center. his company does not advertise for egg donors but said it's a growing business, because more older couples are trying to get pregnant and need donor eggs. wood says colleges are a great place to advertise. because female students are smarter, healthier and more attractive than the general population. >> the younger they are, the better their eggs. >> i don't think i would do it personally. to me, it's something that money can't buy. but i think it's strange. >> reporter: megan says the idea of being paid to let a doctor harvest her eggs makes her very uncomfortable. she thinks the ads take advantage of college students who need money. >> i think that's exactly what they're doing. >> what i've found is that very few donors do it solely for the money. they love the idea that there's a couple that's desperate for a child, and they have a chance to help them. >> reporter: making good money doing it. wood said a woman can make $70,000 by having her eggs harvested a maximum of seven times over a five-year period. >> and we've had egg donors pay their way through colle
by preparing a hundred thousand additional... math and science teachers; training two million... americans with the job skills they need at our community... colleges; cutting the growth of tuition in half and... expanding student aid so more americans can afford it.t. fourth, a balanced plan to reduce our deficit by... four trillion dollars over the next decade, on top of the... trillion in spending we've already cut. i'd ask the wealthy to pay a little more. and as we end the war in afghanistan... let's apply half the savings to pay down our debt and... use the rest for some nation-building... right here at home. t's time for a new economic patriotism, rooted in the... belief that growing our economy begins with a strong... thriving middle cls. read my planan. compare it to governor romney's, and decide for yourself. thanks for listening. i'm barack obama and i approve this message. >> a mother and father say the death of their 12-year-old daughter has uncovered a major problem in the school system. >> now they want to see every school employees trained in cpr. >> this is ce
, and government funded research to push boundaries of science, research, chemistry, biology so smart risk takers turn them into new companies. that was the public side. the private side is the natural entrepreneurship. country. put that together. you get a great america, an an america that delivers on the american dream. we declined on the public side. we need to get back to reinvesting in that. >> host: mark in pennsylvania. plead, go ahead with the question for the two authors. >> caller: yes, i was wondering if -- hello? >> host: we're listening, mark. >> caller: yes, i was wondering if you think it's too late because if you looked at the amount we export and the amount we import from around the world that it might be too late to turn america around? >> host: michael? >> guest: it's not too late. we have exactly enough time to turn it around if we start now. we have the human capital, the resources, and the traditions, but we have to get serious about the challenges, and incidentally, we are bullish on american factories, and there's changes like 3-d printing technology that favors us. we'll
and rescue team is hughes a helicopter and two boats looking for any science of the two men. >> san jose police investigating a brawl that led to the city's 34th home received received-- homicide of the year. when officers arrived they say they found a man with stab wounds. he was rushed to the hospital where he died. his name has not been released. the brawl reportedly involved as many as 30 people. >> police arrested a man in connection with a stabbing. a 57-year-old man was stabbed multiple times with something similar to an ice pick just after one. he was taken to the hospital with nonlife threatening join ires. officers tracked down the suspect early this morning. they say he led police on a brief car chase before being taken in to custody. investigators believe the suspect and the victim knew each a. > al media residents say they were kept awake late last night by loud mice music by a rave held miles away. >> reporter: nearly everybody we talked to was bothered by the noise and as you said they aren't even around the corner from the coliseum. it's a full two miles that way. last
on the global list of whether it's science or engineering or technology or whatever it may be. what has happened to the american dream that has allowed things to get so low in so many key areas. why is the rest of the world overtaking and what should be done about it? >> i think it's priorities and values and greed, really, and at the end of the day, it's greed and lack of leadership to the point why i don't see how it makes so much sense how we spend so much money on prisons versus education, and that doesn't make any sense to me at all. i don't see why we can't manufacture things in america. i don't -- i don't get it. >> i want to pitch in on manufacturing for just a second. one of the problems that we have with american manufacturing is we're an older manufacturing economy, and we areused to paper orders and contract processes and other things. if you go to china and have a network like ollie bubba. we know that we can move more into the internet age with our manufacturing in our bidding and ordering process. >> is china the enemy that many americans see it as or should it be a global trading
's science or engineers or whatever it may be. what has happened to the american dream that's allowed things to get so low. why is the rest of the world overtaking and what should be done about it? >> i think it's priorities and values and greed at the end of the day it's greed and lack of leadership tot point where i don't see why it makes sense that we spend so much money or prisons versus education. that doesn't make any sense to me at all. i don't see why we can't manufacture things in america. i don't get it. >> i want to pitch in on manufacturing for a second. >> one of the problems we have with american manufacture manuf we're older. we are used to paper and those types of things. china has natural sources electronically. we know one of the things we can do in america is move more in the internet age in our manufacturing and bidding and ordering process. >> is china the enemy as many people see it as or should it be a global trading partner. >> i think we live in a very diverse world and we need to embrace that. if china is excelling in something, that's great but guess what, america
to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. c'mon0manp just do it,quick.ú no one's watchingp you0have to if you want to hang with0us ♪musicú the other one tooú good job >> welcome back. we continue with donald trump. i look at the world situation. you deal with the economy i look at the world burning in middle east and islamists and greece and spain and decline of the you euro. 16 trillion in debt. 6 trillion under obama alone. i am worried. i am really really worried about america and the future and lack of leadership at a very important time. what's your worst fear? >> i am worried also. that's one of the reasons i am so involved. i don't need to do this. i don't love doing it. you are a great friend and a friend of mine in the true sense. i would rather be doing other things right now. it's late. you work all day long. you come and shawn is going to interview. >> thanks a lot. >> the truth is or watching you because i always do. >> the truth is i am worried about this country. this country is going in the wr
careful with our science that we don't convict, right, people who are ultimately innocent or in the reverse, that we don't ultimately exonerate people who are indeed guilty. >> if you want to learn more go to cnn.com/justice. we have a lot of great news for you there. i'm barack obama and i approve this message. romney: "it's time to stand up to the cheaters" vo: tough on china? not mitt romney. when a flood of chinese tires threatened a thousand american jobs... it was president obama who stood up to china and protected american workers. mitt romney attacked obama's decision... said standing up to china was "bad for the nation and our workers." how can mitt romney take on the cheaters... when he's taking their side? boring. boring. [ jack ] after lauren broke up with me, i went to the citi private pass page and decided to be...not boring. that's how i met marilyn... giada... really good. yes! [ jack ] ...and alicia. ♪ this girl is on fire [ male announcer ] use any citi card to get the benefits of private pass. more concerts, more events, more experiences. [ jack ] hey,
. >>shepard: doctor, never thought about that one. >> that's science for you. >>shepard: everything will be harmful soon. thank you, doctor. >> the man behind brian griffin will host the biggest event in all of hollywood, and now a new gig hosting the oscars. [ man ] ring ring... progresso this reduced sodium soup says it mahelp lower cholesterol, how does it work? you just he to eat it as part of your heart healthy diet. step 1. eat the soup. all those veggies and beans, that's what may help lower your cholesterol and -- well that's easy [ male announcer ] progresso. you gotta taste this soup. i've got a nice long life ahead. big plans. so when i found out medicare doesn't pay all my medical expenses, i got a medicare supplement insurance plan. [ male announcer ] if you're eligible for medicare, you may know it only covers about 80% of your part b medical expenses. the rest is up to you. call and find out about an aarp medicare supplement insurance plan, insured by unitedhealthcare insurance company. like all standardized medicare supplement plans, it could save you thousands in ou
unprepared we are. good to see you. hacking a computer isn't rocket science. getting to the level of the white house is noteworthy. >>guest: will, they went into the military office, that is the one responsible for keeping america's nuclear launch codes. they could compromise those, we would be in a real world of hurt. you are right, they have gotten so far. part of the reason is because attackers normally have an advantage. that element is, for years we have been afraid to acknowledge that the chinese have been behind unprecedented series of attacks not only for espionage but also to try all sorts of other things. if we are not willing to have the honest conversations with the chinese and with ourselves, of course we can't do very much to protect american networks. >>neil: but we are afraid of the chinese they own so much our debt. companies want to be often their good side and expanding to china, so, we just turn the other cheek? >>guest: we can't. this is now gotten to a whole new level. it is worrisome because of the nuclear launch codes and this is the president, the presiden
guidance and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. [ ♪ music ♪ ] >> cenk: who do you think the larger force in america, the democratic party? the republican party? or independent? really, if you guessed independents you're right. look at this chart since 1990 independents are winning. they used to be lower than democrats and republicans until 1990 but then they take off and as you see they're at the end they're starting to pull away. that's 43% number for the republicans is wrong. independents actually higher than both republicans and democrats. okay so obviously the independents since they're so strong they're representing the upcoming presidential debates right? wrong. they're not represented at all. here is gary johnson from the libertarian party. we'll talk to him on the show. he's not there. and then rocky anderson from the justice party. a man who is actually progressive. the man who used to be mayor of salt lake city and the man who joins us now. rocky, i want to ask you about progressives
fake science behind them that is very popular in the anti-choice movement. >> when you combine that, laura, with the fact that at first when these legitimate rape comments came out, republicans started running from them, now they are stuck with them, let me give you an example. the chair of the gop, rins priebus, tried to distance himself from akin. here he is answering a reporter's question. >> if he stays in, is y'all's position eventually going to change in. >> no. no. no. he can be tied and we're not going to send him a penny. >> but now he's changed his tune. when he was asked if he thought akin was a better opg than mccaskill, priebus says is, quote, i have an obligation to make sure we win as many seats in the senate as possible. i mean, he's a real problem. >> there it is, reverend. i think a month ago republicans wouldn't touch akin with a ten-foot pole. i think the reason wasn't because they were so genuinely offended by akin's remarks but because they had no chance to win the senate race. they encouraged him to get out of the race hoping to replace them with a republican
science with nature for a balanced and radiant complexion. >> drew: lisa, what do you say? >> 675. >> drew: $675. jeannette? >> 550. >> drew: $550. deborah? >> $1,150. >> drew: jennifer? >> what was hers? >> drew: 657, 550 and 1,150. >> 676. >> drew: 676. actual retail price, $1,229. deborah, come on up here. nice to see you. the big 50,? >> yes. >> drew: congratulations, how about that. >> and 10 years cancer-free. >> drew: 50 years old, 10 years cancer-free, everybody. good for you, congratulations. >> thank you. >> drew: george, what do we have for her? >> george: something to celebrate that with, how about a new car. ( cheers and applause ) it's the ford focus se. featuring a two liter engine and electronic stability control, this dynamic hatchback is equipped with power windows and illuminated entry, plus paint and fabric protection, and automatic transmission. it's the ford focus. >> drew: deborah just told me that she told her daughter that shied give her daughter her car if she won a new one on "the price is right". what's your daughter's name? >> lauren. >> drew: lauren, hope you
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